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Anger Management

Our anger management program utilizes SAHMSA’s Anger Management manualized protocol.

TREATMENT

Anger Management

Our anger management program utilizes SAHMSA’s Anger Management manualized protocol. We rely on a combination of this evidence-based manualized treatment as well as an individualized approach tailored to each client’s unique needs and circumstances.

Impulse Control

We treat impulse control using CBT and a mutually developed treatment plan that ensures treatment is individualized.

TREATMENT

Impulse Control

Impulse control interventions are most effective when a cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) approach is used. We treat impulse control using CBT and a mutually developed treatment plan that ensures treatment is individualized.

Coping Skills

Children are often emotional and unpredictable. Sometimes, when children are confronted with new challenges or unfamiliar feelings, they may have difficulty coping with their emotions. Teaching coping skills to your children can go a long way in helping them overcome negative feelings. Use these coping skills when your child is feeling anxious or upset.

COPING SKILLS

5 coping skills to teach your children

Label Feelings

It’s normal for young children to feel frustration or anxiety over situations or emotions that are new to them. If your child is having a meltdown or a tantrum, helping them identify their emotions with words is a helpful coping skill. When you help them put a name to their emotion – like sad, angry, anxious, or frustrated – it helps them put their feelings into perspective.

This doesn’t just apply to negative feelings. When your child is laughing or having fun, say things like, “I see you smiling! Are you happy?” Simple statements like this will help your child learn to identify his/her feelings in a variety of scenarios, which will make identifying negative feelings easier when the time comes.

Practice Patience

Being a supportive parent is difficult work but it will make a big difference in how your child views his/her own emotions. Children often model the behavior of the adults around them. If you become frustrated when your child is having an emotional outburst, this only reinforces the idea that frustration is the appropriate response to having unpleasant emotions.

Instead, practice patience. Encourage your child to use words to express themselves and be open to what they say. Reinforce positive feelings by saying things like, “I love you,” “I’m here for you,” or, “It’s okay to feel upset.”

Do What They Love

If your child participates in activities that they enjoy, it’s a good idea to encourage them to practice these activities when they need to take a break from feeling frustrated. These can be activities like going outside, playing an instrument, or riding a bike. These positive activities can help your child take a step back and cool off from situations that are upsetting them.

For example, if your child becomes frustrated with a sibling, suggest they take a breather by riding their bike. This teaches them that it’s okay to feel frustrated, take a break, and return to the problem when they are ready.

Brainstorm Solutions

When your child is upset, offer solutions to the problem. For example, when they are upset that a sibling will not share a toy with them, you can say things like, “Would you like to play a game until your brother/sister is done?” If they are having a hard time seeing the positive side of things, offering solutions can help them see that their feelings are not permanent and that there are ways to cope. Brainstorm with your child, rather than telling him/her what to do. After you’ve brainstormed, let your child choose which option they would like to go with. They will learn to cope with their emotions independently, and, in time, will be able to identify solutions of their own.

Do What They Love

If your child participates in activities that they enjoy, it’s a good idea to encourage them to practice these activities when they need to take a break from feeling frustrated. These can be activities like going outside, playing an instrument, or riding a bike. These positive activities can help your child take a step back and cool off from situations that are upsetting them.

For example, if your child becomes frustrated with a sibling, suggest they take a breather by riding their bike. This teaches them that it’s okay to feel frustrated, take a break, and return to the problem when they are ready.

Brainstorm Solutions

When your child is upset, offer solutions to the problem. For example, when they are upset that a sibling will not share a toy with them, you can say things like, “Would you like to play a game until your brother/sister is done?” If they are having a hard time seeing the positive side of things, offering solutions can help them see that their feelings are not permanent and that there are ways to cope. Brainstorm with your child, rather than telling him/her what to do. After you’ve brainstormed, let your child choose which option they would like to go with. They will learn to cope with their emotions independently, and, in time, will be able to identify solutions of their own.

Seek Help When Needed

Sometimes your child might need the help of a counselor to work through his/her emotions. This is okay, and it’s important to let your child know that seeking help is encouraged. A counselor can help your child identify difficult emotions and teach them coping skills. During counseling, your counselor might use several techniques, like talk therapy or play therapy, depending on your situation.

Important Takeaways:

  • New emotions can be difficult for children. This is why it’s important to help them label what they are feeling.
  • Patience can go a long way when teaching your child coping skills. Be a model for positive behavior.
  • Talking about feelings is encouraged, and it’s okay to seek help from a counselor when you need it.

If your child is having difficulty coping with his/her emotions, or if they experience anxiety, speaking to a counselor can be helpful for both your child and you, the parent or guardian. Our counselors are experienced in individual therapy, family counseling, and play therapy for children. Learning healthy coping skills can go a long way in improving your child’s behavior. If you are concerned about your child’s behavior, make an appointment with one of our counselors.

Co-Occuring Disorder

What is a co-occurring disorder?

CO-OCCURING DISORDER

What is a co-occurring disorder?

A person with a mental health diagnosis is at higher risk of experiencing an alcohol or substance use disorder. When this happens, it is called a co-occurring disorder. Even so, SAMHSA estimates that nearly 8 million adults in the US struggle with co-occurring disorders. Finding the right treatment that treats both mental health and addiction symptoms is crucial to achieving recovery.

How mental health and addiction are related

People who are struggling with alcohol or substance abuse often have an underlying mental health condition. Alternatively, someone who is experiencing symptoms of depression, for example, might turn to drugs or alcohol to avoid coping with their thoughts and emotions. Drug and alcohol addiction can exacerbate a mental health condition and vice versa, which is why it’s important to find an integrated treatment plan that addresses both disorders.

Diagnosing a co-occurring disorder

The side effects of alcohol and substance abuse are both physical and behavioral. Symptoms of a diagnosable mental illness can be similar to the behavioral side effects of alcohol or drug use, which can make diagnosis difficult. Both mental health disorders and substance use disorders are complex, so receiving a dual diagnosis can take time. Whether or not you are diagnosed with a co-occurring disorder, you should still seek treatment if you are struggling with either substance abuse or mental illness.

Finding the right treatment

An addiction treatment program like medication assisted treatment (MAT) combines medication for addiction with behavioral therapy. MAT is a whole-patient approach, which makes it the ideal treatment for co-occurring disorders.

If you have a primary care physician, you can ask them for a referral for a psychiatric evaluation or addiction treatment. Be honest with them about the symptoms you’re experiencing so that they can make the right recommendation for you.

If you are in treatment for a mental health disorder and are concerned about alcohol or substance use, speak with your therapist. Your therapist can work with you to find the right treatment.

Remember, it’s okay to seek a second opinion if you need more information.

Finding the right treatment

An addiction treatment program like medication assisted treatment (MAT) combines medication for addiction with behavioral therapy. MAT is a whole-patient approach, which makes it the ideal treatment for co-occurring disorders.

If you have a primary care physician, you can ask them for a referral for a psychiatric evaluation or addiction treatment. Be honest with them about the symptoms you’re experiencing so that they can make the right recommendation for you.

If you are in treatment for a mental health disorder and are concerned about alcohol or substance use, speak with your therapist. Your therapist can work with you to find the right treatment.

Remember, it’s okay to seek a second opinion if you need more information.

If you are uninsured or don’t have a primary care physician or therapist, you can still find help. Inspire Counseling Center provides medication assisted treatment (MAT) for uninsured and underinsured patients. To find out if you qualify, you can contact one of our counseling centers. We have locations in Florida and Tennessee and are here to help you.

Anxiety Counseling

Anxiety is common and treatable. We’re here to help, whenever you’re ready.

TREATMENT

Anxiety

Anxiety disorders are the most common form of mental illness in the US, affecting 40 million adults age 18 and older. Learn more about the symptoms of anxiety and treatment options in our library of mental health resources.

Symptoms of anxiety

Anxiety is characterized by extreme fear or worry that is persistent, irrational, or uncontrollable. Anxiety can be debilitating and all-encompassing. When anxiety interferes with your daily routine, it’s possible you have an anxiety disorder.

 

Coping with anxiety

Using strategies such as positive self-talk, having a good support system, eating a well-balanced diet, and staying away from drugs and alcohol are healthy ways of coping with anxiety.

 

Treatment for anxiety

Anxiety can be treated in a number of different ways. Treatment can include therapy, medication, and lifestyle changes that reduce stress. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is one type of psychotherapy that can be effective in treating anxiety.

Anxiety in the family

If you have a loved one who is struggling with anxiety, your understanding can offer them the support they need to take the next step in their journey. It is important to care for them and learn strategies to assist in the process. Support comes in many shapes and forms, including listening.

Coping with anxiety

Using strategies such as positive self-talk, having a good support system, eating a well-balanced diet, and staying away from drugs and alcohol are healthy ways of coping with anxiety.

Treatment for anxiety

Anxiety can be treated in a number of different ways. Treatment can include therapy, medication, and lifestyle changes that reduce stress. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is one type of psychotherapy that can be effective in treating anxiety.

Anxiety in the family

If you have a loved one who is struggling with anxiety, your understanding can offer them the support they need to take the next step in their journey. It is important to care for them and learn strategies to assist in the process. Support comes in many shapes and forms, including listening.

Addictive Thinking

Family Systems In Addictions

Relapse Prevention

Get Help Now.

Our goal at Inspire, Inc. is to assist our clients in accomplishing their goals for a healthier and better life. Explore this site to find the many programs we offer and meet the professional staff behind them. If you have an immediate crisis, we urge you to seek emergency help by calling 911.